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Acute Reversal of Endothelial Dysfunction in the Elderly After Antioxidant Consumption

Harris, Ryan, Wray, D Walter, Nishiyama, Steven K, Zhao, Jia, McDaniel, John, Fjeldstad, Anette S, Witman, Melissa A H, Ives, Stephen J, Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary and Richardson, Russell S (2012) Acute Reversal of Endothelial Dysfunction in the Elderly After Antioxidant Consumption. Hypertension, 59 . pp. 818-824. [Journal article]

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DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.189456

Abstract

Aging is associated with a pro-oxidant state and a decline in endothelial function. Whether acute, enteral antioxidant treatment can reverse this decrement in vascular function is not well known. Flow-mediated vasodilation and reactive hyperemia were evaluated after consumption of either placebo or an oral antioxidant cocktail (vitamin C, 1000mg; vitamin E, 600 IU; -lipoic acid, 600 mg) in 87 healthy volunteers (42 young: 251 years; 45 older: 711 years) using a double-blind, crossover design. Blood velocity and brachial artery diameter (ultrasound Doppler) were assessed before and after 5-minute forearm circulatory arrest. Serum markers of lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, endogenous antioxidant activity, and vitamin C were assayed, and plasma nitrate, nitrite, and 3-nitrotyrosine were determined. In the placebo trial, an age-related reduction in brachial artery vasodilation was evident (young: 7.40.6%; older: 5.20.4%). After antioxidant consumption, flow-mediated vasodilation improved in older subjects (placebo: 5.20.4%; antioxidant: 8.20.6%) but declined in the young (placebo: 7.40.6%; antioxidant: 5.80.6%). Reactive hyperemia was reduced with age, but antioxidant administration did not alter the response in either group. Together,these data demonstrate that antioxidant consumption acutely restores endothelial function in the elderly while disrupting normal endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the young and suggest that this age-related impairment is attributed, at least in part, to free radicals.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:aging, endothelium, free radicals, NO, vascular
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Sport
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Institute
ID Code:27578
Deposited By: Mrs Julie Haydock
Deposited On:21 Oct 2013 08:51
Last Modified:09 Dec 2015 11:16

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