Ulster University Logo

Necessary Torture? Digestive Physiology, Vivisection, the Suffragette Movement and Responses to New Forms of Clinical Practice in Britain c.1870-1920

Ian, Miller (2009) Necessary Torture? Digestive Physiology, Vivisection, the Suffragette Movement and Responses to New Forms of Clinical Practice in Britain c.1870-1920. Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 64 (3). pp. 333-372. [Journal article]

[img] PDF - Published Version
215kB

Abstract

One of the primary aims of late nineteenth-century laboratory experimentation was to ground understandings of illness and disease within new regimes of science. It was also hoped that clinical practice would become increasingly complemented by discoveries and technologies accrued from emergent forms of modern medical enquiry, and that, ultimately, this would lead to improved diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that could be applied to a wide variety of medical complaints. This met with resistance in Britain. So far, analyses of the British reception to forms of scientific medicine have focused on a science versus intuition dichotomy. This article aims to address other aspects intertwined in the debate through an exploration of alternative representations of the medical scientist available and the relation of this to perceptions of clinical practice. Using new technologies of the stomach as a case study, I shall examine how physiologists approached digestion in the laboratory, the responses of antivivisectionists to this, the application of gastric innovations at the clinical level, and the impact of the use of the stomach tube in the suffragette force-feeding controversy.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:history of stomach, history of force-feeding, force feeding in prisons, force feeding of suffragettes
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Arts > School of English and History
Faculty of Arts
Research Institutes and Groups:Arts and Humanities Research Institute > History
Arts and Humanities Research Institute
ID Code:30300
Deposited By: Dr Ian Miller
Deposited On:30 Sep 2014 06:08
Last Modified:17 Oct 2017 16:16

Repository Staff Only: item control page