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Vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: a comparison of capsule and oral spray solution as a method of delivery in a wintertime randomised, open-label crossover study

Todd, Joshua J, McSorley, Emeir M, Pourshahidi, L. Kirsty, Madigan, Sharon, Laird, Eamon, Healy, Martin and Magee, Pamela (2016) Vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: a comparison of capsule and oral spray solution as a method of delivery in a wintertime randomised, open-label crossover study. British Journal of Nutrition, 116 (8). pp. 1402-1408. [Journal article]

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URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/vitamin-d3-supplementation-in-healthy-adults-a-comparison-between-capsule-and-oral-spray-solution-as-a-method-of-delivery-in-a-wintertime-randomised-open-label-cross-over-study/853A1FE159251668790A8423321C2626

DOI: 10.1017/S0007114516003470

Abstract

Vitamin D is typically supplied in capsule form, both in trials and clinical practice. Yet little is known regarding the efficacy of vitamin D administered via oral spray; a method that primarily bypasses the gastrointestinal absorption route. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of vitamin D3 liquid capsules and oral spray solution, at increasing wintertime total 25-hydroxyvitamin D[25(OH)D] concentrations. In this randomised, open-label crossover trial, healthy adults (n=22)received 3000IU (75μg) vitamin D3 daily for 4 weeks in either capsule or oral spray form.Following a 10-week washout phase, participants received the opposite treatment for a final 4 weeks. Anthropometrics and fasted blood samples were obtained pre and post-supplementation,with samples analysed for total 25(OH)D, creatinine, intact parathyroid hormone and adjusted calcium concentrations. At baseline, vitamin D sufficiency [total 25(OH)D >50nmol/L],insufficiency (31-49nmol/L) and clinical deficiency (<30nmol/L) was evident in 59%, 23% and 18% of participants respectively. Overall, baseline mean ± SD total 25(OH)D concentration averaged 59.76±29.88nmol/L, representing clinical sufficiency. Analysis of co-variance revealed no significant difference in the mean ± SD change from baseline in total 25(OH)D concentration between oral spray and capsule supplementation methods (26.15±17.85 versus 30.38±17.91nmol/L respectively (F=1.044, adjusted r217 =0.493, P=0.313)). Oral spray vitamin D3 is an equally effective alternative to capsule supplementation in healthy adults.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:oral spray, capsules, vitamin D supplementation, crossover, comparative effectiveness
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE)
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
ID Code:35848
Deposited By: Dr Pamela Magee
Deposited On:06 Oct 2016 14:15
Last Modified:17 Oct 2017 16:25

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