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Views of Caregivers on the Ethics of Assistive Technology used for Home Surveillance of People Living with Dementia

Mulvenna, Maurice, Hutton, Anthony, Coates, Vivien, Martin, Suzanne, Todd, Stephen, Bond, Raymond and Moorhead, Anne (2017) Views of Caregivers on the Ethics of Assistive Technology used for Home Surveillance of People Living with Dementia. Neuroethics, 10 (2). pp. 255-266. [Journal article]

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URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12152-017-9305-z

DOI: 10.1007/s12152-017-9305-z

Abstract

This paper examines the ethics of using assistive technology such as video surveillance in the homes of people living with dementia. Ideation and concept elaboration around the introduction of a camera-based surveillance service in the homes of people with dementia, typically living alone, is explored. The paper reviews relevant literature on surveillance of people living with dementia, and summarises the findings from ideation and concept elaboration workshops, designed to capture the views of those involved in the care of people living with dementia at home. The research question relates to the ethical considerations of using assistive technologies that include video surveillance in the homes of people living with dementia, and the implications for a person living with dementia whenever video surveillance is used in their home and access to the camera is given to the person’s family. The review of related work indicated that such video surveillance may result in loss of autonomy or freedom for the person with dementia. The workshops reflected the findings from the related work, and revealed useful information to inform the service design, in particular in fine-tuning the service to find the best relationship between privacy and usefulness. Those who took part in the workshops supported the concept of the use of camera in the homes of people living with dementia, with some significant caveats around privacy. The research carried out in this work is small in scale but points towards an acceptance by many caregivers of people living with dementia of surveillance technologies. This paper indicates that those who care for people living with dementia at home are willing to make use of camera technology and therefore the value of this work is to help shed light on the direction for future research.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:Independent living; autonomy, assistive technology; ethics; dementia; Alzheimer’s disease; cameras; video; surveillance.
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Nursing
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Arts
Faculty of Arts > School of Creative Arts and Technologies
Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Communication
Faculty of Computing & Engineering
Faculty of Computing & Engineering > School of Computing and Mathematics
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Social Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Institute for Research in Social Sciences > Communication
Art and Design Research Institute > Future and Virtual Worlds
Computer Science Research Institute > Smart Environments
Computer Science Research Institute
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies
Institute of Nursing and Health Research
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Managing Chronic Illness Research Centre
Computer Science Research Institute > Artificial Intelligence and Applications
Institute for Research in Social Sciences
Art and Design Research Institute
ID Code:36688
Deposited By: Professor Maurice Mulvenna
Deposited On:31 Jan 2017 09:43
Last Modified:01 Aug 2017 09:00

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