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Comparison of different solar reactors for household disinfection of drinking water in developing countries: evaluation of their efficacy in relation to the waterborne enteropathogen Cryptosporidium parvum

Gómez-Couso, H., Fontán-Sainz, M., Navntoft, C., Fernandez Ibanez, P and Ares-Mazás, E. (2012) Comparison of different solar reactors for household disinfection of drinking water in developing countries: evaluation of their efficacy in relation to the waterborne enteropathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 106 (11). pp. 645-652. [Journal article]

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URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2012.07.014

DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2012.07.014

Abstract

Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a type of treatment that can significantly improve the microbiological quality of drinking water at household level and therefore prevent water- borne diseases in developing countries. Cryptosporidium parvum is an obligate protozoan parasite responsible for the diarrhoeal disease cryptosporidiosis in humans and animals. Recently, this parasite has been selected by the WHO as a reference pathogen for proto- zoan parasites in the evaluation of household water treatment options. In this study, the field efficacy of different static solar reactors [1.5 l transparent plastic polyethylene tereph- thalate (PET) bottles as well as 2.5 l borosilicate glass and 25 l methacrylate reactors fitted with compound parabolic concentrators (CPC)] for solar disinfection of turbid waters exper- imentally contaminated with C. parvum oocysts was compared. Potential oocyst viability was determined by inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide. The results demonstrate that static solar reactors fitted with CPCs are an excellent alternative to the conventional SODIS method with PET bottles. These reactors improved the efficacy of the SODIS method by enabling larger volumes of water to be treated and, in some cases, the C. parvum oocysts were rendered totally unviable, minimising the negative effects of turbidity.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:Solar water disinfection PET bottles Compound parabolic concentrators Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst viability
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Computing & Engineering
Faculty of Computing & Engineering > School of Engineering
Research Institutes and Groups:Engineering Research Institute
Engineering Research Institute > Nanotechnology & Integrated BioEngineering Centre (NIBEC)
ID Code:37013
Deposited By: Dr Pilar Fernandez-Ibanez
Deposited On:09 Mar 2017 09:57
Last Modified:17 Oct 2017 16:27

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