Ulster University Logo

Physical activity, well-being and need satisfaction in eight and nine-year-old children from socio-economic disadvantage

Breslin, Gavin, Fitzpatrick, Ben, Brennan, Deirdre, Shannon, Stephen, Rafferty, Ruth, O'Brien, Wesley, Rafferty, Ruth, O'Brien, Wesley, Belton, Sarajane, Chambers, Fiona, Haughey, Tandy, McCullagh, Darryl, Gormley, Richard and Hanna, Donncha (2017) Physical activity, well-being and need satisfaction in eight and nine-year-old children from socio-economic disadvantage. Child Care in Practice, 3 . [Journal article]

[img] Text - Accepted Version
Indefinitely restricted to Repository staff only.

1MB
[img] Other
Indefinitely restricted to Repository staff only.

1MB

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13575279.2017.1299108

DOI: 10.1080/13575279.2017.1299108

Abstract

Background: Need-supportive environments have been shown tocontribute to children’s physical activity levels, and in a few casesto well-being. Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT), thisstudy aimed to determine the influence of psychological need(competence and social relatedness) satisfaction on physicalactivity levels and well-being in children from areas of social andeconomic disadvantage.Method: A total of 211 children aged eight and nine years fromareas of low socio-economic status wore an accelerometer for oneweek, and completed a questionnaire assessing psychologicalneed satisfaction and well-being. Confirmatory factor analysis andpath analysis were conducted to assess the factor structure of themeasures, and to test for theory predicting significantrelationships between psychological needs, physical activity andwell-being.Results: The factor structure of the instruments was supported, anda significant positive relationship was found between athleticcompetence and physical activity (β = 0.19). Athletic competence(β = 0.19), along with parental relatedness (β = 0.32), positivelypredicted children’s well-being. Physical activity alone did notpredict well-beingConclusions: Practitioners may want to consider components ofSDT, reflective of need-supportive environments, when designingphysical activity interventions. Interventions aimed at supportingchildren’s perceptions of competence, and the involvement ofparents, may offer the opportunity to increase well-being.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:Physical Activity; well-being
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Sport
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Institute
Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Institute > Centre for Sports Science and Sports Medicine
ID Code:37868
Deposited By: Mrs Julie Haydock
Deposited On:22 May 2017 10:59
Last Modified:13 Mar 2018 11:16

Repository Staff Only: item control page