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Assessment and management of constipation for patients receiving palliative care in specialist palliative care settings: a systematic review of the literature.

Muldrew, Deborah, Hasson, Felicity, Carduff, Emma, Clarke, Mike, Coast, Jo, Finucane, Anne, Graham, Lisa, Larkin, Philip, McCorry, Noleen, Slater, Paul, Watson, Max, Wright, Eileen and McIlfatrick, Sonja (2018) Assessment and management of constipation for patients receiving palliative care in specialist palliative care settings: a systematic review of the literature. Palliative Medicine, Online . pp. 1-9. [Journal article]

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URL: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0269216317752515

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216317752515

Abstract

ABSTRACTBackground: Constipation is an important issue for patients receiving palliative care within specialist palliative care (SPC) settings. Questions and ambiguity, however, persists about international best practice and management. Aim: To synthesize the current evidence base on the assessment and management of constipation for palliative care patients within a SPC setting.Design: Systematic ReviewData Sources: MEDLINE, Embase, Cinahl, Scopus, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched in April 2017 for empirical studies, written in English, on the assessment and management of constipation in SPC settings, published between 2007 and 2017. Two researchers independently reviewed and critically appraised all studies, conducted data extraction and undertook a thematic analysis. Results: Thirteen studies were included in the review comprising randomised trials (n=3), observational (n=4), and descriptive studies (n=6). Most research was conducted in specialist palliative care units, targeting either healthcare professionals or patients. The analysis highlighted a lack of standard definition of constipation, raising questions on the existence and comparability of baseline prevalence figures, the physical and psychological impact on patients, resource impact on staff and service, the subjective and objective methods of assessing constipation, and key aspects of constipation management, including a lack of focus on non-pharmacological management in this setting.Conclusions: The results of this review are being used to inform the development of an educational intervention targeting health care professionals. Gaps in the evidence base include lack of consistent definition of constipation, constipation prevention, non-pharmacological management, and the consideration of the management of constipation for the dying patient.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:Constipation Assessment Management Palliative Care Patients Hospices Systematic Review
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Nursing
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Institute of Nursing and Health Research
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Managing Chronic Illness Research Centre
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Person-centred Practice Research Centre
ID Code:39257
Deposited By: Dr Deborah Muldrew
Deposited On:21 Feb 2018 11:38
Last Modified:21 Feb 2018 11:38

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