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Effect of high-dose iron supplements on fractional zinc absorption and status in pregnant women

Harvey, Linda J., Dainty, Jack R., Hollands, Wendy J., Bull, Victoria J., Hoogewerff, Jurian A., Foxall, Robert J., McAnena, LB, Strain, JJ and Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. (2007) Effect of high-dose iron supplements on fractional zinc absorption and status in pregnant women. American Journal of Nutrition, 85 (1). pp. 131-136. [Journal article]

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Abstract

Background: Women have an increased risk of iron deficiency during pregnancy because of the demands of the developing fetus. Iron supplements are commonly advocated as a prophylactic treatment and are generally taken with meals to reduce side effects, but iron can interfere with the absorption of zinc. Objective: The aim was to determine the effect of consuming an iron supplement (100 mg Fe/d as ferrous gluconate) with meals from 16 wk gestation to term on zinc status and absorption. Design: Stable-isotope techniques were used to measure zinc status (exchangeable zinc pool, EZP) and fractional zinc absorption (FZA) in early and late pregnancy from a meal consumed at a different time from that of iron supplement or placebo consumption in 6 women given iron supplements and 7 given a placebo. Results: FZA increased during pregnancy, independent of iron supplementation. FZA was significantly higher (P < 0.001) at week 34 than at weeks 16 and 24, and urinary zinc excretion was higher at week 34 than at week 16 (P = 0.02). The size of the EZP remained unchanged throughout pregnancy and was unaffected by iron supplementation. The iron status of iron-supplemented women was higher than that of the placebo group. Conclusions: In iron-replete pregnant women who consumed a Western diet, no detectable adverse effects on zinc metabolism were observed after ingestion of 100 mg Fe/d. An increase in the efficiency of zinc absorption was observed during late pregnancy.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health (NICHE)
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
ID Code:5159
Deposited By: Mrs Alison Deehan
Deposited On:14 Jan 2010 14:34
Last Modified:22 Aug 2012 08:23

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