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Descriptive epidemiology of Cornelia de Lange syndrome in Europe

Barisic, Ingeborg, Tokic, Visnja, Loane, Maria, Bianchi, Fabrizio, Calzolari, Elisa, Wellesley, Diana, Dolk, Helen and EUROCAT, Working Group (2008) Descriptive epidemiology of Cornelia de Lange syndrome in Europe. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 146A (1). pp. 51-59. [Journal article]

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URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117862004/abstract

DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32016


Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome consisting of characteristic dysmorphic features, microcephaly, hypertrichosis, upper limb defects, growth retardation, developmental delay, and a variety of associated malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study of the classical form of CdLS. The data were extracted from the database of European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) database, a European network of birth defect registries which follow a standard methodology. Based on 23 years of epidemiologic monitoring (8,558,346 births in the 1980-2002 period), we found the prevalence of the classical form of CdLS to be 1.24/100,000 births or 1:81,000 births and estimated the overall CdLS prevalence at 1.6-2.2/100,000. Live born children accounted for 91.5% (97/106) of cases, fetal deaths 2.8% (3/106), and terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis 5.7% (6/106). The most frequent associated congenital malformations were limb defects (73.1%), congenital heart defects (45.6%), central nervous system malformations (40.2%), and cleft palate (21.7%). In the last 11 years, as much as 68% of cases with major malformations were not detected by routine prenatal US. Live born infants with CdLS have a high first week survival (91.4%). All patients were sporadic. Maternal and paternal age did not seem to be risk factors for CdLS. Almost 70% of patients, born after the 37th week of gestation, weighed 2,500 g. Low birth weight correlated with a more severe phenotype. Severe limb anomalies were significantly more often present in males. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Nursing
Research Institutes and Groups:Institute of Nursing and Health Research
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Maternal, Fetal and Infant Research
ID Code:6585
Deposited By: Ms Maria Loane
Deposited On:03 Feb 2010 15:06
Last Modified:18 Oct 2011 13:01

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